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  1. Key Takeaways Women scored higher than men when quizzed on stock market basics. 83% of respondents incorrectly defined short selling. The average respondent score on our stock market quiz was 49%, a failing grade. Swathes of new investors have entered the stock market since the pandemic, with first-timers now making up 15% of all retail investors. This is due in part to new apps like Robinhood and Acorn enabling investors to begin with as little as one dollar, while the GameStop phenomenon inspired a frenzy of people to join the investing game. But how much do these newbies know? How much do all investors really know? We spoke to more than 1,000 people who have invested at least once to find out. Investors were asked to rate their own knowledge, which was then put to the test. After asking people basic questions related to the stock market, we were able to see how all types of investors performed. Average scores were broken down by everything from gender and generation to whether participants invested in crypto. We also found out the answers that investors most frequently got wrong. Keep reading to discover our results. Top Portfolio Choices Our study first asked respondents to share what they've invested in. We looked at the top stocks and digital currencies and compared answers by generation. We also asked them to rate their own stock market knowledge before taking the quiz. GameStop was the most popular stock for our respondents in the last six months. A third of investors had put their money on this company, which is actually seeing another financial rally at the time of writing. The second most popular choice was another "meme stock," BlackBerry, which is also up this past month. Even generationally, GameStop and BlackBerry were among the three most popular investments for baby boomers, Gen Xers, and millennials alike. Where cryptocurrencies were concerned, Bitcoin was the most popular by far. Seventy percent of digital investors had invested in Bitcoin, compared to only 39% who invested in Litecoin, the next most popular coin. Only a small 3% invested in coins other than the top 11 options listed. Before taking the exam, most respondents rated their stock market knowledge as average (38.9%) or even above average (31.5%). Only 8.3% were able to admit that their knowledge was below average. As we'll see in the coming research, these responses were falsely optimistic. Investment Knowledge Scores Moving onto the quiz, the next section of our study looks at average scores across all respondents, then breaks those scores down by gender, generation, and crypto ownership. We even compared scores with how each person assessed their knowledge beforehand. Men and women were pretty much neck and neck, although women won the day with an average score of 51.4% in comparison to an average of 50.4% for men. Scores were also not so different among people who said they took the stock market very seriously versus those who were not at all serious about it. In fact, those who took it very seriously actually fared slightly worse than other respondents. What made the real difference was whether or not a person owned cryptocurrencies. Those who did not performed much better with a score of 63.5% than those who did (44.8%). This could be because cryptocurrencies tend to appeal to younger, and therefore less experienced, investors or because crypto investors are opting out of the traditional stock market altogether and have no interest in gaining stock market knowledge. A person's opinion on whether or not the stock market was akin to gambling also seemed to affect how well they performed. Those who saw the process as gambling got only 44% of questions right, compared to 73% for those who saw the stock market as true investing –the highest score of any demographic breakdown. Perhaps it's a healthy love and respect for the stock market that improves knowledge most of all. Common Investment Knowledge Gaps Our study concludes with a look at the specific questions from the investment quiz that most people got wrong. The most common incorrect answers were also analyzed in terms of how much respondents had claimed to know about the stock market prior to taking the quiz. In spite of the short sell behind the GameStop frenzy, 83% of people could not properly identify the definition in a multiple choice question. Short selling refers to borrowing a share of a stock and then selling it. If the price does as anticipated, traders can rebuy the stock at a lower price and hold onto the difference. GameStop was one of the most heavily shorted stocks on Wall Street. And speaking of GameStop, most people couldn't identify the correct term for the abbreviation GME. GME is an example of a "ticker symbol," something that 73% of respondents did not know. More than half of investors couldn't properly explain what the "ask" and the "bid" were, either. For clarification, the "bid" price is the maximum amount that a buyer is willing to pay for a stock. The "ask," on the other hand, is the minimum price that a seller would take for that same stock. Another common knowledge gap was how to correctly define hedge funds, mutual funds, and exchange funds. Investing in Knowledge Ultimately, investment knowledge wasn't reserved for the elites or enthusiasts. Even those who claimed excellent understanding missed basic questions, while the vast majority of all investors failed to pass the test at all. That said, not everybody claimed to take the process seriously and may very well still be enjoying the fruits of their investment decisions. If you are looking to experience the fun of investing (or gambling, as many think of it), try using GamblersPick. Gamblerspick.com has all of the latest information on things like cryptocurrencies and recent jackpots. To get in on the action and expand your knowledge, head to Gamblerspick.com today. Methodology and Limitations This study uses survey data from 1,006 people who have some amount of money in the stock market. Responses were gathered using Amazon Mechanical Turk, where users were presented with a quiz-style survey followed by a variety of other survey questions, including an attention-check question. Of the respondents, 371 identified as women, 634 identified as men, and one individual identified as nonbinary. The survey included 99 baby boomers, 256 Gen Xers, 595 millennials, 34 Gen Zers, and 22 respondents from other generations. All data reported in the above survey rely on self-report, which can be subject to issues such as exaggeration, telescoping, and recency bias. Fair Use Statement If you feel like teaching the world a little something about investing, you're welcome to share the data in this article. Just be sure your purposes are noncommercial and that you link back to this page.
  2. Key Takeaways: Gen Z’s investment habits are more likely to be influenced by Reddit, Twitter, and other social media, while older generations are more likely to have their investments influenced by magazines, newspapers, and TV. Gen Z is less likely to invest in a majority of typical/traditional/common assets but more likely to invest in cryptocurrencies, meme investments, currencies, and NFTs. Gen Z is less likely to invest in collectibles but more likely to invest in clothing and sneakers. Reasons Gen Z and many millennials are investing include the desire to “participate in a movement” and “fight back against institutions.” Investing for All Ages The ‘crypto craze’ has taken the world by storm – a week into 2021, the market value of cryptocurrencies surpassed a whopping $1 trillion. To put its surge into perspective, the value of all digital currencies added up to only around $260 billion last June, and it is now the fifth-most circulated currency worldwide, even surpassing huge economies like India and the UK. With the investment world booming, we wanted to take a closer look at investment strategies among the generations, with a particular focus on Gen Z. Let’s see how often they invest and when they feel is the right time to do so. Also, what kind of assets are they interested in, and what mediums do they use to (attempt to) grow their money? Lastly, we’ll assess respondents’ investment motivations as well as their sensitivity to risk. Read on to see who and what is pulling in the big bucks. Trigger-Happy Overall, a quarter of respondents admitted to investing frequently. It was a relatively popular activity among them, as only 12% said they rarely did it. On a generational level, Gen Zers couldn’t get enough of the practice – 28% said they were constantly investing. That being said, they were also the most likely to say they rarely do. As people got older, they were generally less active in the investment world; millennials were most likely to frequently invest, Gen Xers would do it often, and baby boomers and older generations would only sometimes try their hand at it. Respondents were most eager to invest when they felt like they had extra money to spend. Over half of them pulled the trigger when market conditions were right and would invest on a regular basis. Jumping into the stock market and other investment mediums can be exhilarating, so people should keep a few tips in mind to maximize success: Focus on the future by keeping a long-term perspective, don’t sweat the small stuff, and be open-minded. Weighing the Options With many different asset options to invest in and methods to do so, what do people tend to use the most? By a margin of just over 20 percentage points, the most popular asset to invest in was stocks – almost three-quarters of millennials and Gen Xers preferred to put their money in them over the other options. Putting your money into the stock market can be very financially beneficial – the simplest reason to invest is to grow your wealth, and people tend to amass anywhere between 7% and 10% of their original investment in returns per year. Historically, stocks generally rise and earn more money for investors than other options – therefore, investing in stocks is a relatively safe strategy, making it an attractive choice for many. The most common medium used to invest were retail investment platforms – Gen Zers especially preferred them, but baby boomers (or older) tended to use financial service companies to help them invest their money. There are a ton of investment apps at our disposal, and they are known to excel in different areas – for example, ‘Invstr’ was deemed the best for learning all about investing; ‘Wealthfront’ is known for its sophisticated portfolio management; and ‘Betterment’ is great for people who are interested in socially responsible investing strategies. Assessing Motivations Some are skeptical about the legitimacy of the investment world. Either way, they continue to attempt to grow their money. A conspiracy is afoot, as 77% of respondents believed the markets are manipulated by high-power investors and institutions, and many also agree that the stock market is biased toward them. Generally, baby boomers (and older) were a little more skeptical of these theories, but the younger generations were pretty sure there’s some truth behind them. A lot of research has been done to figure out what’s going on, and technically speaking, it would be difficult to prove that the stock market is rigged for the average investor due to laws and governing bodies, such as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), to keep things in check. That being said, there are clear advantages that higher-ups, such as the money managers on Wall Street, have access to – among them are access to private and sensitive information, a ton of capital, political influence, and generally high experience when it comes to trading. Regarding investment motivations, Gen Zers, and in many cases millennials, did not have the same incentives as older generations. While Gen Xers and older respondents were interested in long-term gains, saving for the future, and making solid returns, their younger counterparts were particularly drawn to doing it for social causes, like fighting back against institutions and participating in movements. Risk and Influences Are people high-rollers, or do they prefer the small victories? Also, what are they influenced by when it comes to investment decisions? From the data collected, we can see that Gen Zers had a much higher risk tolerance than older generations, and baby boomers (and older respondents) tended to prefer to be a little safer with their investments. The most important aspect considered, by far, when investing was the market condition at the time. Instead of the stock fundamentals, Gen Zers were more interested in the tips and opinions from their family and friends, as well as the advice they found on Reddit. Millennials were the most likely to look for advice on social media and were also most likely to attribute moral or ethical reasoning to their investment decisions. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Gen Zers were more influenced by the online landscape, including YouTube, Reddit, and other social media applications, whereas the older generations tended to make their decisions based on what they were seeing in magazines, newspapers, and on television. The reality is, older people just aren't online nearly as much as young people. For example, 2021 Facebook demographic data shows that out of the 2.7 billion active monthly users, 86% of them are aged 18 to 29, whereas only 34% are 65 or older. The difference is even greater for Instagram’s 1 billion active monthly users – the split is 67% to 8%, respectively. The Learning Curve Clearly, the idea of investing has piqued the interest of many Gen Zers. Their preferred assets, method choices, motivations, and considered factors when investing are different than older generations. This is to be expected, especially with how much they use the internet and their dedication to social causes. A common stereotype is that young people are reckless, especially with their financials, but it was Gen Zers who were the most likely to invest to gain more insight about the investment landscape. Aside from the stock market, another way to grow your money is by rolling the dice at the casino. One thing that these two potential money-growing platforms have in common is that if you’re well informed on what you’re doing, you’re more likely to succeed. Gambler’s Pick is your go-to resource for learning about the ins and outs of online gambling – take a look at their casino reviews, helpful guides, and suggestions before diving into the many casino games you can try your hand at on their website. Head over there now to become a gambling guru! Methodology and Limitations We surveyed 872 people about their investment strategies to explore how different generations are investing. Twenty-four percent of respondents were Gen Zers, 27% were millennials, 25% were Gen Xers, and 24% were baby boomers or older. An attention-check question was used to help ensure respondents read questions and answers in their entirety. The data we’re presenting rely on self-report. There are many issues with self-reported data which include, but are not limited to, the following: attribution, exaggeration, telescoping, and selective memory. Fair Use Statement If you know someone who’s interested in dipping their toes into the world of investing or just wants to learn more about investment strategies, feel free to send this article their way. We just ask that you do so for noncommercial use only and to provide a link back to the original page so contributors can earn credit for their work.
  3. Key Takeaways: 45% of respondents had heard of Dogecoin, and 27.6% had invested in it. 30% of respondents believed that Dogecoin was the new Bitcoin. 48.8% of respondents regretted investing in Reddit-hyped stocks, while 40% regretted investing in Dogecoin. More than half of respondents were familiar with NFTs, while 40.5% had invested in NFTs. From Dogecoin to NFTs Bitcoin has been discounted before and still has its critics but always seems to come out on top. Even after years of disappointment, the digital currency came back stronger than ever. And with investing becoming more accessible to masses of people instead of the wealthy elite, we all want to know: What's the future of digital currency? As we saw with the GameStop story, large influxes of micro-investors have scale-tipping abilities comparable to those of established hedge funds. To better understand these scale-tippers, which we now know can hugely sway trading prices, we got to asking. More than 1,000 people across the country recently participated in our crypto trend research. They shared with us their opinions on everything from Reddit’s influence to Dogecoin and NFTs. If you're interested in what the average American was planning to do with these investment opportunities, keep reading. Determining the Future of Dogecoin Dogecoin was actually started as a joke in 2013 based on a popular Shiba Inu meme. But as we know today, jokes have power in the markets. Our study kicks off with a look at Dogecoin, how many Americans have heard of it, and how they feel about Elon Musk involving himself. While most people had heard of Dogecoin through social media (33.7%) or conversations with friends and family (21.7%), Elon Musk was single-handedly popularizing the coin as well. Eighteen percent of respondents had first heard of Dogecoin because of news covering Elon Musk's-related tweets. Most respondents either approved of or didn't care when it came to Musk's Doge-related information. Musk's tweets show enormous support for Dogecoin. When asked if he wanted the coin available for purchase on Coinbase, he tweeted with a resounding "Yes!" moving Dogecoin almost 10% north. Even if he meant it as a joke, we can say Dogecoin is at least considered a safer bet than the lottery –most respondents agreed that they would purchase Dogecoin over a lottery ticket, all costs being equal. Looking Forward to Dogecoin With Dogecoin getting so much attention on social media and from Elon Musk, we wanted to know what respondents felt the future of the currency was. They told us where they thought the price would go, what they would invest, and how it would compare to Bitcoin. People are placing a premium on Dogecoin's meaning in their life. Instead of investing "just for fun" or even to have a safe, reliable investment, the majority of Dogecoin purchasers see this as their chance to truly "get rich." They evidently have massive faith in the price of Dogecoin to soar, as they intended to get this rich with an average investment of $227. If Dogecoin goes up to $1 by the end of the year, however, which 23% of people thought it will, that $227 investment could be worth quite a lot, as the coin is hovering around a worth of just 5 cents at the time of writing of this article. Even with these high hopes, most people didn't see the coin as taking over Bitcoin's place. Instead, most felt Bitcoin would maintain its dominant stance in the cryptomarket. Buying With Bitcoin and Digital currencies Digital currencies like Bitcoin are supposed to be exactly that: currency, or money with which to buy things. We next asked our respondents which retailers they wish accepted Dogecoin as payment. Most people thought it would be a perk for Amazon to accept Dogecoin as payment. While other stores were considered, 41.1% of respondents said they didn't really want any stores to accept Dogecoin. Evidently, the value often lay elsewhere. When asked, however, to consider what they would do were Amazon to release their own digital currency, the resounding answer was to invest. Sixty-four percent of respondents agreed that they would invest in Amazon's cryptocurrency. Fortunately for this group, Amazon's digital currency appears to be in the works. Trusting in Reddit The conversation around investing today often now leads to discourse about Reddit and memes. The next part of our study asks people what their response was to Reddit hypes and what investments they had chosen because of the platform's information. Similarly to an Elon Musk tweet, a group of Redditors also has the power to run up the price of alt coins (like Doge) when they put their mind (and money) to it. Even though it's highly associated with meme-style investing, the Reddit community's power has certainly been proven this year. It is not at all uncommon for digital investors today to use Reddit to inform their investments as well. Reddit's influence became unignorable with the GameStop phenomenon. The little guys from the internet were finally taking on the big hedge funds on Wall Street – and they were winning. GameStop was still the number one investment people made who took Reddit recommendations. Next was BlackBerry, which 31% of people also invested in because of Reddit. While BlackBerry was one of the biggest winners from the initial GameStop frenzy, this stock didn't have as large of a short interest as GameStop, making it harder to maintain the squeeze. The stock has fallen from $30 to around $9. Even though people were much more likely to invest in Reddit stocks than they were Dogecoin, they were also much more likely to regret the investment. While 48.8% of respondents said they regretted their Reddit-informed stock purchases, only 40% said the same thing about Dogecoin. While most planned to shed their Reddit investments within the next six months, perhaps they had higher hopes for Dogecoin still. Non-Fungible Tokens Chances are the acronym NFT has come across your radar more than once recently. NFT stands for non-fungible token. "Non-fungible" means that it's unique and can't be replaced –unlike Bitcoin, which can be replaced for another Bitcoin. NFTs, like truly one-of-a-kind trading cards, are part of the Ethereum blockchain at their highest level, though some others have implemented their own forms of NFTs. The last part of our study asks respondents to weigh in on this ongoing NFT boom. Just under half of respondents had even heard of Ethereum, though slightly more had heard of NFTs (which derive from Ethereum typically). While nearly a third couldn't provide the definition for NFTs, a whopping 61.7% of respondents planned to invest in them shortly. Women expressed particular interest in the opportunity, with 66.1% planning to invest in 2021. While millennials were most familiar with NFTs, almost a third of baby boomers knew the concept as well. NFTs made mainstream news when Beeple's NFT sold for over $60 million at auction – the most expensive NFT sold … so far. Trading and Trusting Even expert traders will tell you there's no way to predict the stock market. That said, there are certainly signposts and indications along the way. In today's Reddit-influenced and digital-informed markets, some of those signposts may be the communities that have arisen. With micro-investors banning together on such massive scales for the first time, the evidence compiled here from everyday Americans may actually indicate where digital currency trends may go. There's still optimism around Dogecoin and cryptocurrency and less hype around Reddit stocks and meme choices. That said, respondents weren't willing to sell everything just yet. If you're interested in having an investing-style community of your own, GamblersPick is the place for you. People from all over the world who share your interests and excitement are available to weigh in on whatever investments you may be considering. You'll also find news, guides, casino information, and whatever you may need related to money and fun! Head to GamblersPick today to check it out. Methodology This study uses data from a survey of 1,001 respondents familiar with cryptocurrencies located in the U.S. Survey respondents were gathered through the Amazon Mechanical Turk survey platform where they were presented with a series of questions, including attention-check and disqualification questions. 59.3% of respondents identified as men, while 40.7% identified as women. Participants incorrectly answering any attention-check question had their answers disqualified. This study has a 3% margin of error on a 95% confidence interval. 5.9% of respondents were Gen Zers, 60.8% millennials, 22.6% Gen Xers, and 10.7% baby boomers. Please note that survey responses are self-reported and are subject to issues, such as exaggeration, recency bias, and telescoping. Fair Use Statement Feeling the frenzy building in yourself as well? Community and sharing information is all part of it. Feel free to share this article, just be sure your purposes are noncommercial and that you link back to this page.
  4. Wallstreet is one of the most respected trading markets in the world. Thousands of professional investors read the markets and ply their trade daily, often making a fortune in the process. It’s usually unheard of for independent small traders to ever get one-up on these giants of the trade industry. In fact, the pros often refer to these indie investors as ‘’dumb money’’, as they are usually destined to lose against the highly compensated analysts and traders who work the stocks for a living. Any investment can be a risky game, especially when high-risk decisions are made without giving thought to the fact that independent traders may not be as ‘’dumb’’ as everyone thinks. In fact, some share shorting practices have come back to bite prominent hedge funders, resulting in a massive $20 billion loss for Wallstreet. What is Shorting of Stocks? Before starting, it is vital that readers understand what “Shorting Stock” is, as this investment term forms the basis for the entire debacle. When an investor decides to short stocks, it means that they borrow stock from a broker without actually paying for it. They then sell the stock with the gamble that its price will fall. Once the contracted time period is up, they must buy the stock back at the current market price. Quick Fact: Shorting is a risky bet. When buying and selling stocks regularly, you only stand to lose up to 100% of your money. When shorting stocks, you could lose far more, depending on the growth of the stock before you manage to buy it back. Hedge funders will often do this if they feel the stocks will drop. This way they eventually pay the broker a lower price after having already made a profit on the deal. Often, these bets pay off, making the investors millions in the process. You Reddit Here Reddit is a social news platform where users can post news pieces and blog posts about various topics that are close to their hearts. Readers can then upvote or downvote their posts, which will either leave them trending as ‘hot news’ or see the posts dwindle away in a short time. Some Sub-Reddit pages deal specifically with certain industries, such as gaming, politics, and investments. It is on the Sub-Reddit page ‘’WallStreetBets’’ that the story begins to unfold with a series of posts that trended well thanks to popular appeal. The year 2020 and the Coronavirus Pandemic was very hard on businesses. GameStop, a chain video gaming store in the USA, went through really dark times, seeing their stock prices drop significantly. Hedge funders saw this as an opportunity to short their stock, as it seemed like there was no way back for the gaming company. They first borrowed and then sold the stocks at between $4 and $11 a share (which is what they were worth last year) with the aim of buying them back cheaper at a later stage. Traders from WallStreetBets noticed that the GameStop stock was moving and recognised that institutional investors were hedging funds and shorting stock on GameStop shares. Using the voice afforded them by Reddit, they urged their communities and friends to buy up as much stock as they could and gang up on the investors, who they believed, had “too much power in the market”. Quick Fact: WallStreetBets is no small community. They boast a current followership of around 3 million readers and supporters. Well, the plan worked and GameStop’s value grew by an astronomical 2000% in a matter of weeks, leaving the hedgers with the need to pay back massively inflated prices on stocks that were borrowed, resulting in losses of up to $20 billion. The stock price of GameStop rose to over $350 at its peak but has nestled back down to $225 as of the 2nd of February 2021. Curbing the Severity by a Margin As a result of the massively volatile swings in the market, trading houses may halt trading on certain stocks to protect their interests. Exchanges halt trading fairly regularly, often because they are required to have a certain percentage of capital on hand to support public trading on their platforms on any given day. If trades become unexpectantly volatile, they will shut shop on those trades for a few minutes or hours as a way to ‘steady the ship’. Free investment app, Robinhood, came under great backlash when they halted trades on GameStop and various other stocks towards the end of January 2021, due to tapped credit lines. While individual investors accused the exchange of collusion with the corrupt, the company called for compassion and apologised for their need to restrict these trades. Chief Executive of Robinhood, Vlad Tenev said: "We understand our customers are upset, we're doing what we can to re-enable buying in these names. We want to be clear in the communications, and I own that we should have been out there a little bit sooner." The trade halts have annoyed many potential investors and have led to high profile celebrities shaming the exchange publically. Two of their customers have even sued them for damages as a result of the restrictive trading. While Robinhood was not the only exchange to halt trading on GameStop and several other trades, it has received the greatest backlash thanks to its popularity in the market space among smaller traders and independent marketers. It is, however, the market instigators that should be most concerned right now! Reddit Readers Beware The SEC is keeping a close eye on this entire debacle. It is not the exchanges that run the risk of penalty, as much as the Reddit instigators. While there is no official statement by the regulator that they are investigating suspicious behaviour linked to market manipulation, it could raise its ugly head. Quick Fact: Market Manipulation happens when someone tries to create excitement and generate activity in a particular stock for the purpose of luring buyers to purchase shares and drive-up the price. If the SEC regulator sees fit, they could launch an investigation to ascertain whether the new GameStop investors that incited the crowds via social media were involved in a pump-and-dump scheme. Whereby they would have hyped up the community, driven up the prices, and then sold their stocks off the back of a manipulated market for massive gains. An investigation would also have to cover whether false or misleading statements were made to drive up the stock price. If found to be the case, this would result in a fraud charge. Finding a Balance For a long time, professionals in Wall Street have looked down their noses at independent investors. Their derogatory terms ought perhaps to be changed, as the community and its hobby-investors have certainly shown that the mighty can fall and have showcased that not only smaller investors can take “dumb money” bets.
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